Sep 24, 2011

Origami Decorations: Halloween Flower

For origami enthusiasts, Halloween fun starts way before October 31st, when we start folding decorations.

I would like to share the first decoration that I folded, a Halloween flower:
Origami Decorations: Halloween Flower
I used Canson Expressions paper for the leaves, and color copy paper for the petals.

The Halloween flower is a variation of my model "Poinsettia". If you like to give it a try, you can fold the Halloween flower by following the Poinsettia diagram.

You need to fold:
  • One "leaves module," black,  12" (300 mm) square.
  • Five "big petals modules," purple, with squares of the following sizes: 8"(200 mm), 6"(150 mm), 4"(100 mm), 3"(75 mm) and, 2"(50 mm).
  • One  "small petals module," yellow, 1 ½" (38mm) square.
The modules are assembled in the same way as in the Poinsettia.

Have you started folding Halloween decorations too?

Sep 17, 2011

Passion Flower - New Origami Model

Passion flowers, also known as passifloras, are very unique and beautiful flowers. Here is my origami version of them:

Passion Flower - New Origami Model

The passion flower model is my design. I folded the flowers in the picture with duo and patterned kami paper: 3" (75 mm) squares for the petal modules, and  2" (50 mm) squares for the stamen modules.
The passion flower petals consist of four "3 Pajaritas"modules that are joined with a stamens module. I called the petals module "3 Pajaritas," because it's just that. It's obtained by dividing the paper in quarters and then folding a traditional spanish pajarita in three of them. The stamens module is a bird base upside down, where each petal is folded inside in half, and then folded down.

The pictures below show the crease patterns and a detail of the modules.
Passion Flower - New Origami Model
Passion Flower - New Origami Model

Sep 10, 2011

Origami Roses, by Toshikazu Kawasaki

In the last meeting of the OH! Origami Houston group, we had a visitor that was interested in learning an origami rose. The name of Toshikazu Kawasaki immediately popped up in the conversation, as he had designed the most famous and exquisite origami roses.

So here are some roses, all designed by Toshikazu Kawasaki:
Origami Roses, by Toshikazu Kawasaki
  • Rose (top left, white), folded from a 6" (150 mm) square of thin washi paper. This rose starts with a square grid. The diagram is in the book Origami for the Connoisseur.
  • Rose bud (top left, red, the smaller one), folded from a 6" (150 mm) square of duo kami paper. This rose starts with a square grid. The diagram is in the book Roses, Origami and Math, and in the book The Greatest Dream Origami (ISBN 9784255005058).
  • One minute rose (top left, red, the bigger one), folded from a 6" (150 mm) square of thin washi paper. This rose can be folded from a template, that is available in the book The Greatest Dream Origami (ISBN 9784255005058).
  • Rose (top right, pink), folded from a 9" (225 mm) square of Pacon Paper Squares (very thin and strong paper, nice to fold!). This rose starts with a 22.5 degree diagonal grid. The diagram is in the book Roses, Origami and Math, and in the book The Greatest Dream Origami (ISBN 9784255005058).
  • Leaves (top right), folded from a 6" (150 mm) square of thin washi paper. The diagram is in the book Roses, Origami and Math, and in the book The Greatest Dream Origami (ISBN 9784255005058).
  • Crystal roses (bottom left, pink), folded from a 9" (225 mm) square of Pacon Paper Squares. The four buds are folded from a single sheet of paper. The model starts with a square grid. I tied the model with a ribbon to help keep it together. The diagram is in the book The Greatest Dream Origami (ISBN 9784255005058). 
  • Bridal roses (bottom right, white), folded from a 9" (225 mm) square of Pacon Paper Squares. The four buds are folded from a single sheet of paper. The model starts with a diagonal grid that is cut from a square grid. I tied the model with a ribbon to help keep it together. The diagram is in the book The Greatest Dream Origami (ISBN 9784255005058). 

Sep 4, 2011

Coasters - Decorating with Origami

Decorating with origami is so much fun! There are so many options!
On this occasion, I used a set of photo coasters, and instead of photos, I decorated them with small origami models.
This can be a great gift for the upcoming Holidays, and you can personalize each coaster for every member of the family.

Coasters - Decorating with Origami
Each coaster measures 3 ½" x 3 ½" (88 mm x 88 mm), and the display measures 2 ½"x 2 ½" (63 mm x 63 mm). The final size of the origami models used for decoration are very small, so try to choose simple models. The models must also fold flat.

In this set, I included the following origami models:

Dad's coaster
  • Shirt, by Marcela Brina, from 4 ½" x 1 ½" (113 mm x 38 mm) duo kami paper. This is a variation of the traditional kimono model. The video instructions can be found here.
  • Pants, by Rachel Katz, from 3" x 1 ½" (75 mm x 38 mm) kami paper. The diagram can be found in the book  Origami, Easy-to-Make Paper Creations by Gay Merrill Gross.
Mom's coaster
  • Two tone dress, by Gay Merrill Gross, from 2" x 2" (50 mm x 50 mm) duo kami paper. The diagram can be found in the book Minigami, by Gay Merrill Gross.
  • Hat, by Gay Merrill Gross, from ¾" x ¾" (19 mm x 19 mm) duo kami paper. The diagram can be found in the book Minigami, by Gay Merrill Gross.
  • Handbag, traditional, from 1" x 1" (25 mm x 25 mm) duo kami paper. The diagram can be found in the book Minigami, by Gay Merrill Gross.
Boy's coaster
  • Baby bodysuit, traditional, from 1 ½" x 3" (38 mm x 75 mm) kami paper. This is the traditional shirt model with two extra folds (the two bottom corners were folded back). The diagram can be found in the book The Practical Illustrated Encyclopedia of Origami, by Rick Beech.
  • Ball, not an origami model. It's a sticker.
Girl's coaster
  • Baby bodysuit, same as in baby boy's coaster.
  • Pinwheel, traditional, from ½" x ½" (13 mm x 13 mm) kami paper. The diagram can be found in the book The Magic of Origami, by Alice Gray and Kunihiko Kasahara.